Nicky Classen
Nicky Classen

The wild horses of the Namib captivate NICKY CLASSEN

Driving from South Africa to Luderitz – about an hour away – we found a concrete mini pyramid sign  indicating the wild horses viewpoint.  After following the dirt road for about 20 minutes, we stopped at the shady spot and waited. Within half an hour we could see ostriches, springbok and these extraordinary horses approaching the waterhole for sundowners. It was getting late so we decided to return the next day.

Gorgeous colours of the Namibian landscape. Picture: Nicky Classen
Gorgeous colours of the Namibian landscape. Picture: Nicky Classen

From Kolmanskop ghost town we drove back to the waterhole amid blue sky, yellow grass, and red tinted mountains, where I set up my camera gear and waited. About an hour later ostriches, springbok, an oryx and a jackal approached the waterhole then one by one the wild horses trickled in, glowing in the sunset.

The horses are not indigenous to Sub-Saharan Africa so how have they survived here?

Once abandoned, they were left to fend for themselves. The population deteriorated during Namibia’s severe drought in 1998 and the international community raised money for their supplementary feed. By the following March 1999 when rains returned, they were back on their feet again.  They’ve flourished ever since and long may they continue to do so.

The magnificent wild horses of the Namiib have had to fend for themselves for years.
The magnificent wild horses of the Namiib have had to fend for themselves for years.

There are a few guidelines that you should follow:

Don’t feed or touch the horses.

Stay in the viewpoint and don’t venture out near their waterhole.

Respect them and their environment.

More pictures of these magnificent horses  here